Category Archives: Uncategorized

Revised Standard

FEDERATION CYNOLOGIQUE INTERNATIONALE (AISBL)
SECRETARIAT GENERAL: 13, Place Albert 1
er
B – 6530 Thuin (Belgique)
___________________________________________________
___________________________
07.02.2017/ EN
FCI-Standard N° 38
WELSH CORGI (CARDIGAN)
©
M.Davidson, illustr. NKU Picture Library
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
2
ORIGIN
: Great Britain.
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF THE OFFICIAL VALID
STANDARD
: 30.10.2016.
UTILIZATION
: Herding & companion.
FCI CLASSIFICATION
: Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle
Dogs (except Swiss Cattle
Dogs).
Section 1 Sheepdogs.
Without working trial.
GENERAL APPEARANCE
: Sturdy, tough, mobile, capable of
endurance. Long in proportion to height, terminatin
g in fox-like brush,
set in line with body.
IMPORTANT PROPORTION
: Length of foreface in proportion to
head 3 to 5.
BEHAVIOUR / TEMPERAMENT
: Alert, active and intelligent.
Steady, not shy nor aggressive.
HEAD
: Foxy in shape and appearance.
CRANIAL REGION:
Skull: Wide and flat between ears; tapering towards
eyes above
which it is slightly domed.
Stop: Moderate.
FACIAL REGION:
Nose: Black, projects slightly and in no sense blun
t.
Muzzle: Tapering moderately towards nose.
Jaws / Teeth: Teeth strong with scissor bite, i.e.
upper teeth closely
overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the j
aws. Underjaw
clean cut. Strong but without prominence.
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
3
Eyes: Medium size, clear, giving kindly, alert but
watchful
expression. Rather widely set with corners clearly
defined.
Preferably dark, or to blend with coat, rims dark.
One or both eyes
pale blue, blue or blue flecked permissible only in
blue merles.
Ears: Erect, proportionately rather large to size o
f dog. Tips slightly
rounded, moderately wide at base and set about 8 cm
(3.5 ins.) apart.
Carried so that tips are slightly wide of straight
line drawn from tip
of nose through centre of eyes, and set well back s
o that they can be
laid flat along neck.
NECK
: Muscular, well developed, in proportion to dog’s
build,
fitting into well sloping shoulders.
BODY
: Fairly long and strong.
Topline: Level.
Loin: Waist clearly defined.
Chest: Moderately broad with prominent breast bone.
Brisket deep.
Well sprung ribs.
TAIL
: Like a fox’s brush set in line with the body and
moderately
long (to touch or nearly touch ground). Carried low
when standing
but may be lifted a little above body when moving,
not curled over
back.
LIMBS
: Strong bone. Legs short but body well clear of th
e ground.
FOREQUARTERS:
Shoulder: Well laid, angulated at approximately 90
degrees to upper
arm, muscular.
Elbow: Close to sides.
Forearm: Slightly bowed to mould round the chest.
Forefeet: Round, tight, rather large and well padde
d. Turned slightly
outwards.
HINDQUARTERS:
General appearance: Strong, well angulated and alig
ned with
muscular thighs and lower thighs; strong bone carri
ed down to feet.
Legs short.
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
4
Metatarsus (Rear pasterns): Vertical when standing,
viewed from
side and rear.
Hind feet: Round, tight, rather large and well padd
ed.
GAIT/ MOVEMENT
:
Free and active, elbows fitting close to sides,
neither loose nor tied. Forelegs reaching well forw
ard without too
much lift, in unison with thrusting action of hindl
egs.
COAT
Hair: Short or medium, of hard texture. Weather-pro
of, with good
undercoat. Preferably straight.
Colour:
Accepted colours are blue merle, brindle, red, sabl
e,
tricolour with bridle points and tri colour with re
d points.
All of the above with or without typical white mark
ings on head,
neck chest, underparts, legs and feet, white tail t
ip. White should
nod predominate on body or head where it should nev
er
surround the eyes. Nose and eye rims must be black
. Liver and
dilute colours highly undesirable.
SIZE AND WEIGHT
:
Ideal height at withers: 30 cm.
Weight: In proportion to size with overall balance
the prime
consideration.
FAULTS
: Any departure from the foregoing points should b
e
considered a fault and the seriousness with which t
he fault should be
regarded should be in exact proportion to its degre
e and its effect
upon the health and welfare of the dog
and on its ability to perform
its traditional work.

FEDERATION CYNOLOGIQUE INTERNATIONALE (AISBL)
SECRETARIAT GENERAL: 13, Place Albert 1
er
B – 6530 Thuin (Belgique)
___________________________________________________
___________________________
07.02.2017/ EN
FCI-Standard N° 38
WELSH CORGI (CARDIGAN)
©
M.Davidson, illustr. NKU Picture Library
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
2
ORIGIN
: Great Britain.
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF THE OFFICIAL VALID
STANDARD
: 30.10.2016.
UTILIZATION
: Herding & companion.
FCI CLASSIFICATION
: Group 1 Sheepdogs and Cattle
Dogs (except Swiss Cattle
Dogs).
Section 1 Sheepdogs.
Without working trial.
GENERAL APPEARANCE
: Sturdy, tough, mobile, capable of
endurance. Long in proportion to height, terminatin
g in fox-like brush,
set in line with body.
IMPORTANT PROPORTION
: Length of foreface in proportion to
head 3 to 5.
BEHAVIOUR / TEMPERAMENT
: Alert, active and intelligent.
Steady, not shy nor aggressive.
HEAD
: Foxy in shape and appearance.
CRANIAL REGION:
Skull: Wide and flat between ears; tapering towards
eyes above
which it is slightly domed.
Stop: Moderate.
FACIAL REGION:
Nose: Black, projects slightly and in no sense blun
t.
Muzzle: Tapering moderately towards nose.
Jaws / Teeth: Teeth strong with scissor bite, i.e.
upper teeth closely
overlapping the lower teeth and set square to the j
aws. Underjaw
clean cut. Strong but without prominence.
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
3
Eyes: Medium size, clear, giving kindly, alert but
watchful
expression. Rather widely set with corners clearly
defined.
Preferably dark, or to blend with coat, rims dark.
One or both eyes
pale blue, blue or blue flecked permissible only in
blue merles.
Ears: Erect, proportionately rather large to size o
f dog. Tips slightly
rounded, moderately wide at base and set about 8 cm
(3.5 ins.) apart.
Carried so that tips are slightly wide of straight
line drawn from tip
of nose through centre of eyes, and set well back s
o that they can be
laid flat along neck.
NECK
: Muscular, well developed, in proportion to dog’s
build,
fitting into well sloping shoulders.
BODY
: Fairly long and strong.
Topline: Level.
Loin: Waist clearly defined.
Chest: Moderately broad with prominent breast bone.
Brisket deep.
Well sprung ribs.
TAIL
: Like a fox’s brush set in line with the body and
moderately
long (to touch or nearly touch ground). Carried low
when standing
but may be lifted a little above body when moving,
not curled over
back.
LIMBS
: Strong bone. Legs short but body well clear of th
e ground.
FOREQUARTERS:
Shoulder: Well laid, angulated at approximately 90
degrees to upper
arm, muscular.
Elbow: Close to sides.
Forearm: Slightly bowed to mould round the chest.
Forefeet: Round, tight, rather large and well padde
d. Turned slightly
outwards.
HINDQUARTERS:
General appearance: Strong, well angulated and alig
ned with
muscular thighs and lower thighs; strong bone carri
ed down to feet.
Legs short.
St-FCI N° 38/ 07.02.2017
4
Metatarsus (Rear pasterns): Vertical when standing,
viewed from
side and rear.
Hind feet: Round, tight, rather large and well padd
ed.
GAIT/ MOVEMENT
:
Free and active, elbows fitting close to sides,
neither loose nor tied. Forelegs reaching well forw
ard without too
much lift, in unison with thrusting action of hindl
egs.
COAT
Hair: Short or medium, of hard texture. Weather-pro
of, with good
undercoat. Preferably straight.
Colour:
Accepted colours are blue merle, brindle, red, sabl
e,
tricolour with bridle points and tri colour with re
d points.
All of the above with or without typical white mark
ings on head,
neck chest, underparts, legs and feet, white tail t
ip. White should
nod predominate on body or head where it should nev
er
surround the eyes. Nose and eye rims must be black
. Liver and
dilute colours highly undesirable.
SIZE AND WEIGHT
:
Ideal height at withers: 30 cm.
Weight: In proportion to size with overall balance
the prime
consideration.
FAULTS
: Any departure from the foregoing points should b
e
considered a fault and the seriousness with which t
he fault should be
regarded should be in exact proportion to its degre
e and its effect
upon the health and welfare of the dog
and on its ability to perform
its traditional work.
Advertisements

TOPIC FOR DISCUSSION: Correct Cardigan Front Legs

Barbara Miller

TOPIC FOR DISCUSSION: Correct Cardigan Front Legs

from “Welsh Corgi Cardigan Purebred Information”

This topic was given to me by one of our members who asked why Cardigan legs are crooked and wanted to know if breeders are addressing this to make them straighter like those of a Pembroke. (Please keep those questions coming!)

So let’s talk about those beautifully, curvy Cardigan legs and why they are the way they are.

To begin, I have attached a stock photo of a Cardigan from the front, as well as a photo of one of the less ideally constructed bully sub breeds. One could argue that both breeds carry a lot of chest. In the Cardigan, the chest is deep and wide to provide for plenty of lung and heart space. Dogs carry approximately 70% of their weight on their front legs. In the Cardigan, the legs curve around the chest (called the wrap) and settle well beneath the shoulders so that the dog’s weight is supported by two pillars, the legs.

In the bully type, the shoulders are wide and set apart like an apex. The chest is suspended between them, causing the weight of the body to be supported primarily by muscle and ligament. Without the leg bones acting as a structural support, this dog would be prone to soft tissue injuries were it asked to conduct strenuous labor.

I have also posted two diagrams that illustrate the same principle on the Cardigan. A correctly built Cardigan has a scaffold supporting its weight. An incorrect one resembles a bridge with no arch to dissipate weight.

Here is an excellent article describing it further: http://www.cwcorgi.com/Aragorn/Judging.htm

This brings us to turnout. The Cardigan’s front feet should turn out SLIGHTLY, no more than 30% or, if standing above the dog, the feet should aim to be no wider than clockhands at 5 minutes to 1, with the head at 12:00. Too much turnout, and structural weakness occurs, usually in the primary shock absorbers between feet and wrist, called the pasterns. Arthritis and strains might become an issue.

But we should not be aiming for straight front feet like the Pembroke. The Pembroke standard requires the feet to be neither in nor out. It is important to remember that although both breeds carry the generic Welsh word for common or cur dog (Corgi), these dogs are not the same breed, and they are not two types of the same breed. They were erroneously considered two sides of one breed for 7 years almost 100 years ago, and a very small handful of breeders did cross the two during that time, but most breed fanciers recognized that these were two breeds even at that time and did not cross them.

The Pembroke just plain is not built the same as the Cardigan. Its legs do not wrap around the chest like a Cardigan’s do. The Pembroke is built more like its Spitz ancestors, breeds that include everything from the Samoyed reindeer herder, with shoulders similar to the other Spitz drafting breeds, including Huskies, to breeds like the Schipperke and Pomeranian.

The Cardigan is a Teckel breed. Its family includes the Basset hounds (many different types still in Europe) and the Dachshund. Notice that if we straighten the legs and move them outward, as in the incorrect Cardigan diagram, the feet straighten. When the legs are under the shoulders, supporting the dog’s weight, the feet balance slightly outward. The dog would lost stability if the feet were straight or turned inward.

The Basset Hound breed standard requires a front end very similar in structure to the Cardigan, also recognizing that those front feet need to turn out slightly for balance. http://www.basset-bhca.org/index.php…

The Dachshund breed standard also requires a greatly similar front to the Cardigan and also mentions that the front feet may turn out slightly. http://www.dachshundclubofamerica.org/breed-standard/

Here are some other articles that may help explain why the Cardigan’s front legs are just right the way they are. And I look forward to seeing the input from others, as well.

http://www.cardicommentary.de/articles-pat/frontass.htm

http://cardigancorgis.com/Education/cardigan-front.asp

http://www.cardicommentary.de/front.htmcardi front drawingfront

Overdoing it

ONE PERSON’S OPINION:

by Patrick Ormos, Phi-Vestavia Cardigans, USA

“Overdoing It!”

Perhaps one of the most difficult things for breeders to do is to find a balance between all the different things which they are looking for in trying to produce a “perfect” Cardigan Corgi. In fact, finding that balance in any breed is very difficult. There are certain things about a breed which we, the breeders look at and value above anything else. We often characterise these things as “type”.

We will say something about the beautiful head type, or how the ears are so typically Cardigan, or how wonderful it is to see that extraordinary length of back on the dog. Or perhaps we will rhapsodize over the wonderful round feet, or whatever it is that we feel really makes a difference.

But, let’s just stop for a minute and think about things. What does this do to the breed which we all love? How do our Corgis turn out?

If most of us are honest, we will note that many of our dogs do not look markedly different than they did a few years back. In some ways we have not progressed a great deal. I believe that we have lost sight of the whole for looking at the parts. If we also look closely at our dogs we will note a disturbing trend, one which mirrors what has happened in German Shepherds, that is, that the extreme looking dog has begun to win…at the expense of the balanced dog.

I believe that we are forgetting that the Cardigan is not an extreme aesthetic dog, but a balanced moderate functional one.If the Cardigan is truly a moderate, balanced and functional herding dog, then what should his structure be like? That is the primary question for all of us who are breeders, and for those of us who judge the breed as well.Let me share with you some questions. I will try to express my opinions about them in future articles. You may not agree. In fact, I hope that some of you do not, and that we can get a real dialogue of articles going on this breed. Only in this way can we begin to learn more about it. The Cardigan front consists of more than the radius and ulna bones. Granted that those are understood as unique by many people, just how unique should they really be? What functional difference does it make?

What has happened to the scapular and the humerus. In most breeds the ideal relationship between these two is that they are almost equal in length. Check your Cardigans out and notice how many of them are very short in upper arm. What kind of shoulder layback do we want in this breed? Why?Toplines are easily seen, and quite obviously very controversial. There are some very different interpretations on what the Cardigan topline (backline) should look like. What do you think?What kind of ribbing should the Cardigan have? I have seen everything from slab-sided dogs to barrel-ribbed dogs, and their owners claim that each one of them is correct. I am not prepared to accept that both are correct interpretations of the Standard.How do the ribs interact with the front legs, the shoulder blade and the upper arm to influence movement in the Cardigan?

A good answer to this kind of question would go a long way to convince people, judges and breeders, as to the correctness of a certain kind of ribbing.How wide is too wide in front? How narrow is too narrow? How does that affect the working ability of the dog. It is not just all aesthetics, it is also practical working ability that we are breeding for.How long is too long? I have noticed some Cardigans coming into the ring looking as if they should be in the Dachshund ring. Can a Cardigan get too long?

Certainly they can be too short-coupled – but what exactly are we talking about? Is it a loin that is too short? Is it the impression that is too short? Is it that the vertebrae are too short, thus actually causing a shorter back (this is indeed a real possibility)? Is it just that when the dog looks too much like a Pembroke the first thing that we say is that it’s too short?Rear assemblies are a bone of contention. We run the gamut from under-angulated and straight to over-angulated like a German Shepherd.

The old UK breeders suggest that the hind leg should look “like a ham”. What does that mean? How long a hock do we want, and how does that affect movement?These are just a few questions. There are others. We all need to look at our dogs with clear and critical eyes. Malicious rumours are not the way to educate and improve a breed. Free and open discussion is.

Sent to Corgi Quarterly (June 29, 1989)

Studs SWE

Breeder prefix: KENNEL CARDAX

Such Cardax Loke

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • SE V-2010 Cardax Powel

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Margareta Widin
  • address:587 37 Linköping
  • tel: 013-150726
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL GRASSIKAS


    Born to be Bomba Superman Gaucho

    Ahnentafel/pedigree

  • Breeders:ULLA STÄÄV & ANNA-MARIA STÄÄV
  • telefon 016-356281
  • Eskilstuna
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL MIGEVA

    Cymraeg Ci Jolly Joker

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • Cymraeg Ci Hurricane

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeders:Helen Henriksson & Elisabeth H. Malmqvist
  • address:Kils-Nytorp 226
  • s-705 93 Örebro, Sweden
  • Home: +46(0)19-29 87 64
  • Mobile: +46(0)70-390 63 29
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: GUSIKAN KENNEL

    SE UCH Nord JV-07 Smygens Andy
    pedigree/Ahnentafel

  • breeders:Stefan & Mija Lindborg
  • address:Kullvägen 1
  • 823 93 Segersta, Sweden
  • e-mail
  • tel:+46 (0)278- 801 64
  • Stefans Mobile: 070-649 82 91
  • Mijas Mobile: 070- 662 83 14

  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL NICKNAME’s

    Cardax Powell

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • CH Nicknames’s Canon Shot

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Carina Widin Sandell
  • Telefon: 013-59394
  • Mobil: 070-5232376
  • Adress: Rogestad Krongård, 585 92 LINKÖPING
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: FROMAX KENNEL – Welsh Corgi Cardigan

    SE UCH SE V-11 Fromax Bilbo Bagger

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • Fromax Peregrin Took

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Petra och Susan Marteus
  • address:643 33 VINGÅKER
  • tel:0151-138 28
  • Mobil: 0704-44 67 44
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: BLATIRAN KENNEL – Welsh Corgi Cardigan

    S UCH, FIN UCH Gowerston Diesel

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • LP 1 BLÅTIRANS ERNST-EDDIE ERÖVRAREN

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Paula & Andreas Holmqvist
  • address:Långtjärnsvägen 17
  • address:955 91 Råneå
  • tel:+46924 510 44
  • e-mailPaula
  • e-mailAndreas
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL CARDDICTED

    Int Uch, Such, Nuch, Finuch, NordUch,SV-04
    All Trade Gravytrain

  • Ahnentafel
  • SE UCH Carddicted Chain Reaction

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Malin Eriksson
  • address:247 96 Veberöd
  • tel:+46 (0)76 18 46 333
  • Mobil:
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL STOCK DOG’s

    STOCK DOG ´S ROCKET MAN

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • Lindblommans Terminator Hunk

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:
  • address:443 43 Gråbo
  • tel:++46(0)302-41245
  • mobil:0700479894
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL LISTE LINE

    DK UCH, SE UCH, VDH CH, NO UCH, FIN UCH Blondies American Stock

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • Liste Line Aragon

  • pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Lisbeth Nilsson
  • address: Klagstorp:
  • tel: +46(0)410-26617:
  • Mobil: +46(0)736-127595
  • e-mail
  • Breeder prefix: KENNEL POSSIBLE’s

    Such o Nuch Immes Diamond Drop

  • Pedigree/Ahnentafel
  • breeder:Helena o Kjell Olsson
  • address:Höghult 11 54695 Karlsborg :
  • tel:0505-22013 0761020719 :
  • e-mail